Community Support for ELLS

community support for ellWhen building a support network for English language learners (ELLs), community organizations can play a valuable role and offer resources that schools may not have at their disposal in order to work with ELLs and their families. While the community schools model is one way that these partnerships can grow and thrive, a school need not be an official community school to have effective partnerships. Follow this link to learn more about supporting ELLs and their families.

Advertisements

Using an interpreter for conferences or communicating with families?

If you plan to use an interpreter to connect with our ELL families this year please follow the link to our new document: How to Work with an Interpreter – Tips & Advice.”

interpreterWe hope this information will help you have productive and effective conversations with our ELL Families when using an interpreter.

Thank you,

Catherine Carrison, Ph.D.

ELL Department Manager

Evergreen Public Schools

360.604.4007 ext. 4470

EPS Academy Offers Real Learning that Translates Directly to the Classroom

Do you need time and support to plan units that your kids will engage in and care about?

Sign up for: Learning Design for the Workshop Classroom, or Supported Unit Planning in PBL / Inquiry

My students have Chromebooks, now what?

Beginners, click here! Past beginner, but need more? Click here

Struggling to reach your at-risk kids?

Develop your skills in supporting students with social-emotional and cognitive learning needs in this session: Structures, Systems, and Routines to Create a Calm Classroom out of Life’s Chaos

Join us on November 20 & 21st at the EPS Academy at Cascade Middle School to get exactly what you need; and earn up to fourteen clock hours doing it!

OnebyOne 2018!

 OBO-2018

August 14, 15 & 16

SAVE THE DATE!!

Dates have been set and the planning is beginning for OnebyOne 2018!

We want to hear from you! Tell us your hopes and dreams for OnebyOne 2018 here.

Mark your calendars and plan to join the excitement on August 14, 15 & 16th, 2018.

Meeting a Rock Star

A few years ago Eddie Vedder threw me his tambourine during a concert. I like to fantasize that he picked me out of the crowd because my praying mantis-like dance movements caught his eye; in reality I just out-jumped the people around me to snag it spinning in the air above our heads. Still, I felt connected to my musical idol in a way I never had before. (Humor me here.)  Continue reading “Meeting a Rock Star”

What’s the Work During Modeling?

Having looked at conceptual modeling in science last spring, this might be a good time to consider some questions about instructional modeling in any content.

Instructional modeling of strong and weak work is a key practice for helping our students meet their learning targets. Sam Bennett emphasizes modeling during mini-lessons and catches in That Workshop Book as a way for students to develop as readers and writers.

So what are students expected to do during the time that teachers are modeling? Do students know what they are expected to do? How can we help them get the most out of these minutes? Perhaps we need to engage students in some meta-modeling: demonstrating the thinking and reflective practices that we want students using as they observe us modeling. Metacognition is critical to all phases of learning, including instructional modeling.

Modeling strong and weak work is included as the second strategy of Jan Chappuis’ Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. While it is a common practice to show students positive examples of work that is proficient or exemplary, sometimes we forget the value of modeling weak work. Not wanting to point fingers at struggling students, we might avoid sharing examples of student work that needs improvement. But in order to help students notice and be able to articulate the differences between strong and weak work, we need them to observe, discuss, and make comparisons for themselves. The act of comparing and identifying areas to improve becomes the student work during modeling. Two ideas for making modeling weak work a safer activity for students:

  1. Using the teacher’s “work” as a weak example. This provides a safer opportunity for students to examine work critically as they provide feedback to the teacher instead of one another.
  2. Looking at weak work or incorrect responses and asking “Why might an intelligent person have thought ____?” This creates an opportunity for students to be critical and identify misconceptions, while still honoring the thinking of students who might hold those same ideas.

What strategies do you use to help students get the most out of instructional modeling? Please share in the comments below!

 

Dual Immersion: Carrying the torch for linguistic diversity!

I am so proud to work in Evergreen Public Schools where programs and people demonstrate the power of linguistic diversity that our students bring to our classrooms. The Columbian featured our Dual Immersion program that recently rolled up to Wyeast Middle School.  Our elementary Dual Immersion schools, Marrion and Pioneer, are the foundation. It is in these elementary schools where Dual Immersion students, English-learners and English-only, begin a lifelong journey in which both Spanish and English open doors to countless opportunities and pathways to success. Please take a minute to read about the fabulous work our schools are doing in carrying the torch for linguistic diversity!WYE-dual-language_08