Fort Vancouver Regional Library Summer Reading Program

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Check out this opportunity for reading fun through the Fort Vancouver Regional Library!

Read, earn prizes, and visit the library for amazing performances and activities June 15 – August 15, 2017.

How it works:

  • Summer Reading is open to all ages.
  • Register online or at your library, then start logging time on June 15.
  • Make reading a daily habit. Set your own daily reading goal.
    • Log the days you meet your reading goal.
    • Log a day of reading if you attend a library program.
  • Youth aged 0-18 years, earn a prize when you reach 15, 30 and 45 days read — visit your library by August 15 to choose your prizes.
  • Everyone, when you reach 15, 30 and 45 days read you get an entry in the Grand Prize Drawing for one of these great prizes:
    • $200 Amazon gift card for each age group: 0-5 years old, 6-11 years old, and 12-18 years old
    • Two (2) nights at Skamania Lodge for adults

You can also:

  • Write and read reviews online.
  • Tell us a little about what you like to read and receive book recommendations via email.

Fake Fake News

Earlier this month I offered some resources that teachers could use to help fight fake news (see below for the original post). I realized recently that it may (unfortunately) be necessary to define exactly what “fake news” means since it can readily be seen and heard in at least two very different contexts.

The first way to interpret “fake news” is the way I intended it to be interpreted in my post. Let’s call this “real fake news” (I know that is a bit awkward). This would be something published (in print, on-line, on TV, etc.) that is created purposefully to mislead. An example of this kind of “fake news” you may have heard about in the real real news (confused yet?) about Macedonian teens who made lots of money by fabricating fake news designed to get clicks (clicks can equal $$ on the internet).

Adding to the confusion is the President who had done his best to redefine the term fake news by using it to describe legitimate media outlets who happen to report something unflattering to his administration such as this tweet from April 25:

“Don’t let the fake media tell you that I have changed my position on the WALL. It will get built and help stop drugs, human trafficking etc.” 

Politics aside, this re-branding of this term very likely has created even more confusion for young people trying to figure out their world (and trying to figure out who to trust).

 

Here is the original post with resources for addressing fake news:

Fighting Fake News? Try these Online Resources

One of the key pieces of life-long learning that teachers can instill is the ability to question and evaluate information. For help teaching students about how to fight fake news, check out these free online resources:

Take the Challenge

reading-without-walls-logoExpand your reading horizons and take the Reading Without Walls challenge! National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, Gene Luen Yang, calls us all to read without walls, exploring books promoting diverse understandings and opening readers’ eyes to new ideas and experiences.   To take the challenge:

  1. Read a book about a character who doesn’t look like you or live like you.
  2. Read a book about a topic you don’t know much about.
  3. Read a book in a format that you don’t normally read for fun.
  4. Invite  others to do the same!

EPS Integrated Scope and Sequence Site

It’s here! We’ve been working on the new integrated scope and sequence for elementary writing, reading, social studies, and science for over a year now. Thank you to the teachers, coaches, and principals who have provided feedback throughout the process.

You can access the site through the links provided here, using the Evergreen Bookmarks folder in Chrome, or through ClassLink.

At the site, you’ll find information specific to the content areas of  ELA, social studies, and science with images and links to resources. On the grade level pages, all 36 units for grades K through 5 are included, with unit themes, standards, resource suggestions, and integrated literacy task ideas.

We’ll continue to improve the format, add more details, and link more resources to make this resource as valuable and accessible as we can, but we continue to need your help. If there’s something that we can do to make the site better, please let us know! Your ideas and feedback will help us prioritize the ongoing work.

Linking the Known to the New

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I have a confession to make. Despite working in the curriculum department, despite quite a few years in this education field, and despite reading, researching, and hours of discussions with colleagues…I’m still trying to figure out what personalized learning is.

Good news, though, if you’re sitting next to me on the same gently rocking boat–it’s OK. We still have time. In my case, things became clearer when I listened to students.

Last Monday night I drove my two boys to Covington Middle School for their 6th grade orientation/showcase night. Wearing both my educator and dad hats, we toured familiar hallways (to me, at least; my 5th grader’s eyes bulged a bit at the rows of lockers and the open staircase in the entry, “Is this school really TWO WHOLE STORIES?”). I slyly introduced him to some 6th grade teachers, and embarrassed him in front of Mr. Gourde, the principal (“I can text him anytime, you know.”). Continue reading “Linking the Known to the New”

Fighting Fake News? Try these Online Resources

One of the key pieces of life-long learning that teachers can instill is the ability to question and evaluate information. For help teaching students about how to fight fake news, check out these free online resources:

Let’s Teach Empathy

I’ve had the opportunity to meet Newsela founder and CEO Matt Gross a couple times and always walk away impressed with his vision for supporting classroom teachers with relevant, timely resources. Check out the text sets in Newsela, and then give his blog post a read below.

Newsela Blog

Colleagues,

Teachers do a lot of things they aren’t paid to do — like teaching empathy.

We live in fraught times. The discourse among political leaders, talking heads and even some community and family members has broken down. As adult Americans, we hold strong convictions, but we sometimes don’t seek to understand others. That trickles down to our children. Teachers hear it every day: a remark or a snicker about a child with autism; an American history class debate that culminates in shouting and finger-pointing; a Friday night football game that turns ugly with deportation threats.

Strong convictions aren’t enough. Children must learn empathy. You can’t really understand the feelings or experiences of others from a slogan or sound bite. Empathy isn’t learned 140 characters at a time.

Fortunately, teachers teach it every day.

That’s why we’ve launched the A Mile In Our Shoes reading initiative in partnership with Teaching…

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