Clever Badges Now Recommend for Use with iPads

The following information was shared with Elementary Academic Coaches and Elementary Teacher Librarians…
 
Recently we shared with you Classlink QuickCards (QR Code based login) as a method for younger students to easily log into apps for use on our iPads. Unfortunately, we have discovered some inconsistencies with Classlink Cards not logging students out of apps, thus causing the possibility of a student not being logged out when another student logs into Classlink on the iPad.
 
Clever Badges Recommended
Because of this inconsistency, we are no longer recommending the use of Classlink QuickCards with our student iPads. We are now suggesting that students utilize Clever Badges as the preferred method for accessing curricular tools on the iPad.
 
When using Clever Badges, it is important to remind students to log out of any apps they have opened using the badges and to also log out of Clever when finished.
 
Printing Clever Badges
For information on printing Clever Badges, please follow the link below.
 
Teachers can access Clever for Evergreen here:
 
Classlink Quick Cards and Chromebooks Working Properly
For those using Chromebooks, Classlink Quickcards continue to work properly and should be used to log younger students into Chromebooks. 

What’s the Work During Modeling?

Having looked at conceptual modeling in science last spring, this might be a good time to consider some questions about instructional modeling in any content.

Instructional modeling of strong and weak work is a key practice for helping our students meet their learning targets. Sam Bennett emphasizes modeling during mini-lessons and catches in That Workshop Book as a way for students to develop as readers and writers.

So what are students expected to do during the time that teachers are modeling? Do students know what they are expected to do? How can we help them get the most out of these minutes? Perhaps we need to engage students in some meta-modeling: demonstrating the thinking and reflective practices that we want students using as they observe us modeling. Metacognition is critical to all phases of learning, including instructional modeling.

Modeling strong and weak work is included as the second strategy of Jan Chappuis’ Seven Strategies of Assessment for Learning. While it is a common practice to show students positive examples of work that is proficient or exemplary, sometimes we forget the value of modeling weak work. Not wanting to point fingers at struggling students, we might avoid sharing examples of student work that needs improvement. But in order to help students notice and be able to articulate the differences between strong and weak work, we need them to observe, discuss, and make comparisons for themselves. The act of comparing and identifying areas to improve becomes the student work during modeling. Two ideas for making modeling weak work a safer activity for students:

  1. Using the teacher’s “work” as a weak example. This provides a safer opportunity for students to examine work critically as they provide feedback to the teacher instead of one another.
  2. Looking at weak work or incorrect responses and asking “Why might an intelligent person have thought ____?” This creates an opportunity for students to be critical and identify misconceptions, while still honoring the thinking of students who might hold those same ideas.

What strategies do you use to help students get the most out of instructional modeling? Please share in the comments below!

 

Hapara and Google Classroom Sync

Over the summer our IT department has made some changes to Hapara and how classrooms are rostered in this tool. We now roster via Google Classroom. This new method helps us avoid  a few issues that we encountered with too many folders being created in a student’s Google Drive.

We have created a handout that walks you through the steps.

How to Access Your Classrooms in Hapara…

Dashboard_Manage_Classes

Brand New One by One Sessions Involve Kids!

Watch Kids in Action as they Interact and Learn with Sphero, Seesaw, BeeBot Coding and Scratch!

K-2 Seesaw Classroom Observation & 3-5 Seesaw Classroom Observation
Come and see what Seesaw looks like in action!  See how students are able to use Seesaw when given choice in demonstrating their understanding.  

K-2 BeeBot Coding Classroom Observation
Bee-Bot is an exciting new robot designed for use by young children. This colorful, easy-to-operate, and friendly little robot is a perfect tool for teaching sequencing, estimation, problem-solving, and just having fun!  During this session, participants will be able to observe students learning to code and problem solve.  

3 – 5 Sphero Robotics Classroom Observation
Sphero Edu uses app-enabled robots to foster creativity through discovery and play, all while laying the foundation for computer science. Sphero goes beyond code with collaborative STEAM activities, nurturing students’ imaginations in innovative and engaging ways. During this session, we will be able to see students being introduced to the Sphero, and engage in programming to solve a problem using the Sphero.

K-2 Sphero Robotics Classroom Observation 
Sphero Edu uses app-enabled robots to foster creativity through discovery and play, all while laying the foundation for computer science. Sphero goes beyond code with collaborative STEAM activities, nurturing students’ imaginations in innovative and engaging ways. During this session, we will be able to see students being introduced to the Sphero, and engage in programming to solve a problem using the Sphero.

3-5 Ozobot Coding Classroom Observation
Ozobots are miniature smart robots that can follow lines or roam around freely, detect colors, and can also be programmed. During this session, we will be able to see students engage in programming to solve a problem using the Ozobots.  

K-2 Scratch Jr. Coding Classroom Observation & 3-5 Scratch Coding Classroom Observation
Watch kids create their own interactive stories, games and animations using Scratch.

Listen to Students’ Honest Stories of Their School Experiences
Uncovering Hidden Bias
During this session, a panel of high school students will share their stories and experiences living and learning as an EL in Evergreen Public Schools.

Google Summit Coming to Union High in August

Want to learn everything Google from the those in the know? The Digital Bug Washington Google Summit will be held at our own Union High School this summer!

ESD112 describes the event like this:  It’s a day of learning, sharing, and fun that will focus on skills, strategies, and products that make a meaningful difference in classroom instruction. From Google Classroom to Chrome, from Google Docs to Google Sheets, you’ll hear skilled presenters and knowledgeable colleagues discuss ways to make the most of Google’s free products. With a mix of beginner, intermediate, and advanced-level topics, you’re sure to find sessions that fit your interests. Session topics will be posted on the summit website as they become available.

Participants should bring a charged wireless device to the summit.

Early registration of $135 ends July 9th, 2017.  Regular registration, after July 10th, 2017, is $150 and will close on August 2nd, 2017. Register here.

Join us in the Tech Sandbox!

Just the right mix of support and exploration.

When it comes to integrating tech into the classroom, most people need time to explore and someone in the wings who can be available to answer questions. 

Your EdTech Team will be hosting a Tech Sandbox for teachers of all grade levels at Frontier Middle School on June 26, 27, and 28th. 

Drop into the sandbox at anytime to explore these tech tools: Hapara, OneNote, Google Classroom, It’s Learning, and Seesaw.  The entire EdTech Team will be available to answer questions and support you right where you are with the tools that you need.

  • If you’d like a short introductory face-to-face launch, check out the schedule here.
  • Miss the launch? No worries! Anytime video launches are available for Hapara, Seesaw & Google Classroom.  The EdTech Team will also be available to help you get started on OneNote and It’sLearning as needed.

The Sandbox is open to teachers and staff of ALL grade levels.  Come and play with us!

Now Even More Great Courses in the One by One Line-up! Check it out!

Now there are even more great courses to choose from in the One by One line-up!

Did you know that our conference will be opened to the public on Monday, May 22nd? Be sure to register now to ensure that you have first chance at the courses that are best for you! Spread the word!

Library Girl Jennifer LaGarde brings us…

New Tricks for Old Dogs: a BreakoutEDU Experience

The interwebs are for more than just getting information.  There is a whole host of tools that can transform learning in your classroom – some of them have been around for decades.  In this session, we’ll teach some of those old dogs to do some new tricks while immersed in a BreakoutEDU experience that is a digital and physical hybrid. Strategies for introducing this type of activity to your students and the tools used to create it will be shared. (3-12)

An Act of Justice: The Roles of School Librarians in Breaking The Cycle of Poverty

If, as Nelson Mandela said, “education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world,” school libraries represent a unique and powerful opportunity to impact our most vulnerable students.  In this session, Jennifer LaGarde explores ways in which we can build school library spaces and programs that both help students living in poverty envision a better life but that also, empower them with the skills and abilities necessary to achieving it. (K-12)

140 Character Love Story: Harnessing The Power of Twitter for Professional Learning.

When teachers connect, students win! Still, there are far too many educators who have yet to take advantage of Twitter as a tool for building professional relationships, growing a personal learning network (PLNs) and finding resources to improve teaching and learning for students. In this session, we’ll focus on why being connected matters and participants will leave with a vast array of resources to help make becoming a connected educator easy! (K-12)

Moving from Decoration to Documentation: Creating Library Spaces That Matter

First impressions matter. And in this session, participants will explore ways to create library spaces that not only cultivate learning, but that also reflect innovative practice.  With an emphasis on tips and suggestions from the field, that can be achieved on any budget, the focus of this session will be to help School Library Media Coordinators create spaces that leave every visitor (be they a student, parent, principal or school board member) absolutely convinced that the work happening in the library is both aligned to school-wide goals AND positively impacts student learning. (K-12)

Read. Tweet. Repeat.  Using Social Media To Cultivate Communities of Readers.

Instead of trying to compete with it, let’s harness the power of social media to generate excitement about reading, spark meaningful conversations and build the types of communities that support a life long love of reading. From #2jennsbookclub to #30secondbooktalks, this fun, interactive session is all about using the tools of today to keep our students and colleagues reading tomorrow. (3-12)

Katherine Livick, Professional Development Manager for Digital Learning, ESD 112 brings us…

Google My Maps in the Classroom

Did you know that your Google Apps for Education account includes the ability to create and edit customized Google maps? My Maps offers unique possibilities for fun, engaging, and student-centered learning across many content areas and grade levels. Come and check it out! (3-12)

Coding with Ozobot and Google Blockly

What can you do with a cute little robot that fits in the palm of your hand? Lots! This session will give you an overview and demonstration of how Ozobots can be used to teach coding, logic, and engineering concepts with students as young as third grade.

HEALTH WARNING: Please note that the Ozoblockly demo will involve rapidly flashing lights. Attendees who may be prone to seizures should use caution if attending this session. Please ask the presenter if you have any questions. (3-12)

David Jakes, expert in Personalized Learning Environments brings us…

Learning Space Design Challenge!

Great design starts with a sharpie, post-it notes, and trace paper.  In this session, begin developing the skills of an educator-designer that can help you to re-think and re-create learning spaces.  Work individually or in teams to create new designs that support new conditions for learning.  You’ll be challenged to sketch and draw like an architect, iterate your designs, and begin developing a design lens that helps you look at space differently.  You’ll have a chance to experience new furniture first-hand and incorporate it into your designs.

Our session goal will be to create a gallery of new spatial designs that can showcase the potential of educators to redesign their current spaces or create new spaces that dramatically impact teaching and learning. (K-12)

Beyond the Steel Frame Desk:  Why Furniture Matters

All educators can visualize the typical classroom and the traditional furniture that it contains.  But the vision of what the classroom is, and how it supports a contemporary learning experience, is rapidly changing.  For this to occur, there needs to be a fundamental change in how classrooms are designed to support student learning.  

In this session, you’ll have a chance to experience an essential element of that re-design process first hand – classroom furniture.  Learn what is available, the capabilities and the nuances of modern educational furniture, and how new furniture can directly support the design of new student learning experiences.  Join us to sit, stand, push and pull, swivel and rock, and learn what’s beyond the steel frame desk!

Workshop:  Understanding and Creating Next-Generation Learning Spaces

How people work, learn, and engage with others is dramatically changing.  New opportunities to connect with people, to resources, and to ideas emerge daily.  At the same time, new physical and digital spaces have emerged that support these new connections and opportunities.  As expected, these shifts have compelling implications for how school learning spaces are designed and how they function.  

In this workshop, learn about the trends and patterns that are impacting school learning space design.  We’ll examine classrooms, libraries, makerspaces, and digital spaces to see examples of best practice design and how these emergent trends are being incorporated into schools.  You’ll learn learning space basics, the language of learning spaces, and how to use a design process to create any type of learning space.  

This workshop is highly participatory and will provide you with the opportunity to evaluate your beliefs about the importance of learning spaces, how spaces impact teaching and learning, and how next-generation learning spaces are created and employed to provide students with the opportunity to engage and learn in new ways.

Tim Lauer, Director of Digital Learning for Evergreen Public Schools brings us…

Using Social Media to Tell Your Story

Schools can either tell their own story or let someone else tell it for them. They can highlight the work that exemplifies their mission, or they can put the power to choose in someone else’s hands, and then find themselves misconstrued or unfairly criticized. This session will explore a number of resources that allow schools to capitalize on the power of Social Media and ways to celebrate the best in your classroom, building, library, or district.(P-12)

Using Remind to Communicate with Families

What is Remind? Remind is a communication messaging service for teachers and administrators that allows them to reach parents and students via text messages. Parents opt in to receive announcements and other class/school communications. Many Evergreen teachers and administrators already utilize Remind to communicate with families and students. Learn how they use Remind to increase family and student engagement. (P-12)

Creating a Classroom or School Blog Using WordPress

Blogging is a great way for teachers to share the work taking place in their classrooms with parents, peers, and the larger school community. This session will introduce you to setting up a classroom blog. Participants will learn how to use WordPress to create and publish content. Participants will leave the session with a functioning classroom blog. (P-12)