OnebyOne 2018 Registration Open Today!

OBO-2018

Engaging facilitators, good food, unabashed fun, and refreshing learning that matters for you and for kids! Take a look at the line-up for OnebyOne 2018 and register now!

Jaime Casap – Jaime Casap is the Education Evangelist at Google. Jaime evangelizes the power and potential of technology and the web as enabling and supporting tools in pursuit of promoting inquiry-driven project-based learning models. Working with the Google for Education Team, Jaime collaborates with school systems, educational organizations, and leaders focused on building innovation and iteration into our education policies and practices. He speaks on education, technology, innovation, and generation z, at events around the world. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jaimecasap

Allison Zmuda – Co-author of Learning Personalized and Students at the Center: Personalized Learning with Habits of Mind, Allison is dedicated to helping teachers “imagine learning experiences that are worthy of the pursuit of both students and teachers”.  Her mission is to “support transition from an outdated process to one that is relevant to the teacher and student.” Allison recognizes that the journey into personalized learning can initially be uncomfortable. She holds a deep respect for teachers in the work they do, and seeks to provide a living strategy to guide them and their students through this ever-changing world. http://allisonzmuda.com/about-allison-zmuda/

John Norlin – Co-founder of Character Strong, John teaches about the power of caring schools and communities, and ignites the fire of Servant Leadership for both adult and student learners. At a young age John began to learn first-hand that even a single person being intentional with their actions can create a tidal wave of positive change. In the past twenty years, John has worked with organizations, companies, teams, schools, and individuals on the topics of building influence, strengthening relationships, improving the climate and culture of organizations, and individual and group character development. http://www.johnnorlin.com/playvideo/

Kristin ZiemkeKristin lives and breathes the work everyday in her third grade classroom in Chicago.  She empowers teachers to combine best practice in teaching with technology to amplify student learning. Kristin is co-author of Amplify and Connecting Comprehension and Technology.

Cris Tovani Cris teaches high school full-time while working tirelessly to ensure that secondary teachers have the tools to engage their students in reading, writing and talking.  Cris is the author of I Read It, but I Don’t Get It and Do I Really Have to Teach Reading?

David JakesDavid uses design thinking to inspire educators as they re-imagine learning environments that are creative, comfortable, respectful and safe places for kids and teachers to stretch and take risks.

Page KeeleyScience Guru Page Keeley is an expert in the areas of leadership, standards-based curriculum and instruction, formative assessment, and instructional coaching.  She is adept at helping teachers understand how to use probes and formative assessment to increase the quality of learning in science classroom

Steve Gillcreator of “The ELL Critical Data Process”, Steve is an expert at distinguishing between disability and language acquisition. He works with both EL and SpEd educators on the evaluation process to ensure that students are receiving what they need without being mis-identified.

Gisela Ernst-Slavit – Gisela spreads the message that academic language is an equity imperative; and it’s so much more than just vocabulary! Dr. Ernst-Slavit is professor of education and ELL at WSU. She has co-authored several books has a passion to help teachers understand how to effectively plan instruction that benefits all students, especially your language learners.

Angelina Kreger – Angelina was an instructional coach and social studies educator in Novi, Michigan. She believes that when engaging social studies content is paired with masterful instruction that students are truly provided the building blocks that they need to be successful. She will help teachers engage students in BIG History that weaves evidence and insights from many scientific and historical disciplines across 13.7 billion years into a single, accessible story.

Abbey FutrellAbbey is a Digital Innovation Coach who is committed to redefining professional development to make it relevant and relatable to today’s educators. Her experience as a teacher, district tech facilitator, and instructional coach allow her to take a realistic and sometimes humorous look at the benefits and pitfalls of digital teaching and learning.

Lanny BallLanny is an expert on the Lucy Calkins Writing curriculum. His mission is to support teachers as they seek to reach all students in the literacy workshop.

Amy Lucenta & Grace Kelemanik – co-authors of Routines for Reasoning: Fostering the Mathematical Practices in All Students, Amy and Grace help teachers implement the Standards for Mathematical Practice with a focus on all kids, including special populations.

Mark Ellis – Mark’s work is focused on strategies for mathematics instruction that make meaningful learning accessible to diverse groups of students. Throughout his teaching career, Mark has been driven by a desire to create opportunities for all students to learn important mathematics concepts and skills, particularly those who are from historically underserved groups.

Kris Lindeblad – Kristine  has a passion for mathematics and kids that has led her to a lifelong career in mathematics education. She has taught middle school and high school, been a math instructional coach, and math coordinator for Spokane Public Schools.  She works and learns with teachers as they strive to ensure best practices and instructional excellence in mathematics.

Michele Dufresne – Michele is a classroom teacher and literacy specialist who has spent most of her life teaching children to read. She is the co-developer of Literacy Footprints. Michele is an expert in supporting teachers as they develop the skills they need to facilitate high quality small group and differentiated instruction in reading.

 

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Innovative Math in 3 Acts

Last week I had the pleasure of working with an awesome group of fifth graders over at Burnt Bridge Creek Elementary. Their equally awesome teacher had contacted me on the rumor that I had a plan for a class to develop and film their own 3 Act Tasks. In truth, I only had about 5/8 of a plan but as I was also the one that started that rumor, so I was eager to close the deal.

The idea of 3 Act Tasks comes from Dan Meyer a math teacher/guru and blogger out of Oakland. In Three-Act Tasks, students are shown an image or video that depicts an interesting situation. Examples of elementary tasks might include an image of two sisters standing side-by-side, one taller than the other, or a video of candy being poured into a jar. A good task will suggest some mathematical features or relationships that children may wonder about. After viewing the image or video, students are engaged in asking mathematical questions, identifying important information that is needed to answer those questions, constructing mathematical models of the situation, and comparing their models to the real world.

(Dan Meyers collection   Graham Fletchers collection)

The activities are real world, engaging and require deep inquiry.  They are also beautifully simple in structure. Three short video clips, and a couple leading questions. Reasoning that if deep thinking is required for an outcome then equally deep contemplation must be needed for the creation we set up the perimeters with the class.

  • We used “old math,” concepts at least a grade level below their current work.
  • Teams of 4 or 5
  • A cast of hands and arms (No head or face shots in the video.)

The class had already seen several 3 Act Tasks in their daily grind but we watched a couple more with different eyes. This time looking for how they were laid out, trying to figure out what was enough info to raise questions without doing the work for the learners. As this was our first outing we looked for ways to mimic patterns without stealing ideas.

It was tricky keeping the groups centered on a single task. The temptation to create a 3 tasks was a common distraction. The realization that the work required both a problem and an answer was a bit of a disappointment to some.

 

The results:

For three days a group of 5th-grade students as varied and diverse as any in our district were actively engaged in understanding and explaining real-world math problems. (some of which involve candy)

The class was exposed to a new way of approaching any task by asking themselves not only what math is being asked of them but also the whys and hows of the request.

We all learned about the magic of video editing, and that first attempts are best designed to be explorations not a nominee for best educational short.

We will work on that nomination next time.

What the Gingerbread Ninja Heard

Last week we had the opportunity to work with the kindergarteners at Fishers Landing. While I am not one of those gifted with the native talents of a primary teacher, I have spent enough time with its inhabitants to be comfortable with the habits and fluent with most aspect of their communication.

Kinders are a highly intelligent group; they are strikingly honest, deeply empathetic, and shockingly self-focused. In fact, it is not uncommon to witness all of these behaviors within moments of each other and sometimes simultaneously.

We were working with the students to develop their skills and understanding of story form. To do that we were recording unique variations of The Gingerbread Man story, as told to us by the students, with sound effects of student-chosen characters added in editing. The concept is simple enough. The classes had already read a variety of gingerbread stories and the kids had identified the common elements, such as the gingerbread character meeting three different characters before meeting its untimely end. From there, it doesn’t take much work to convince a five-year-old to create their own story; and for a student of the digital age adding sound effects seems like something that has always been a part of good stories.

All that was left was for them to write their script, or create a storyboard if they liked that idea better. It was nothing complex, or even wholly complete in most cases, just something on paper that kept them on track during the telling, something that showed the order of events.

To watch this writers workshop was to bear witness to 21st-century alchemy. The subtle yet sloppy mixing of graphite, grim and… something strangely sticky yielded pure gold on several levels.

 

(Link to just a couple of student audiobooks)

Academically, the students offered strong evidence of understanding story sequence, rhyming, the power of iterations and patterns. They talked about and demonstrated the use of tone, voice, and inflection at levels they won’t be asked to reproduce for another six years.

Socially, the students were excited, engaged, and eager to share. Jimmy, whose face bore evidence of at least one sticky substance, had a four-page story with only a couple letters but plenty of heavily lined images that did not do justice to the epic adventure of a gingerbread ninja that fought off howling wolves, growling bears, and a hissing snake only to be swallowed by an alligator.

Eva’s story didn’t have the illustrative quality or intensity of Jimmy’s, but it was eight pages long and Eva wrote and then read every word, and became quite critical of using the “right cat sound.” Still unsatisfied with my efforts after four attempts, she took pity on me.

“I don’t think you can do it so how ‘bout I just make the sound and say them where I want them.”

We recorded countless riffs and covers of the classic lines “run, run as fast as you can…” some in the sugary sweet voice of a cookie and other laid out like old school rap. The students also felt free to use an animal from well beyond the barnyard standards. The resident realist wanted the sound of joggers chasing a cookie, only to be followed by the next storyteller who needed the sounds of a unicorn, mermaids, and a shooting star.

Make no mistake, the product quality was low, the background volume high, and the running time was inconsistent, ranging from 11 seconds to 3 and a half minutes. It took us most of the first class to adjust and configure the lesson into something that was going to work. But it did work.  The audio stories added authentic and real academic discussions between kindergarten students.

It takes a little prep but no more than most new lessons.

Soundbible.com has a huge collection of royalty free sounds you can download.

Mp3converter.net lets you copy/paste any youtube video into its page and converts it into a ready-to-use mp3 file because, unfortunately, soundbible doesn’t have a unicorn or mermaid sound. Youtube does. A unicorn sounds like a running horse with magical twinkling in the background, in case you were curious.

Audacity is a free sound editing software already on most teachers’ devices. It’s not super user-friendly but easy enough if you stick to the cut and paste to start with.

Community Support for ELLS

community support for ellWhen building a support network for English language learners (ELLs), community organizations can play a valuable role and offer resources that schools may not have at their disposal in order to work with ELLs and their families. While the community schools model is one way that these partnerships can grow and thrive, a school need not be an official community school to have effective partnerships. Follow this link to learn more about supporting ELLs and their families.

Using an interpreter for conferences or communicating with families?

If you plan to use an interpreter to connect with our ELL families this year please follow the link to our new document: How to Work with an Interpreter – Tips & Advice.”

interpreterWe hope this information will help you have productive and effective conversations with our ELL Families when using an interpreter.

Thank you,

Catherine Carrison, Ph.D.

ELL Department Manager

Evergreen Public Schools

360.604.4007 ext. 4470

How to get students to better identify fake news

Given increasingly fast and bite-sized nature of information production, distribution, and consumption it is becoming increasingly important for people do develop some special skills to employ when being hit with fake news. One way to develop the skills needed to deal with fake news is to learn how it is created and the tricks it employs and a great way to do that is to create fake news. Here is an article about some teachers who who have their students write fake news stories so they can better detect it.

EPS Academy Offers Real Learning that Translates Directly to the Classroom

Do you need time and support to plan units that your kids will engage in and care about?

Sign up for: Learning Design for the Workshop Classroom, or Supported Unit Planning in PBL / Inquiry

My students have Chromebooks, now what?

Beginners, click here! Past beginner, but need more? Click here

Struggling to reach your at-risk kids?

Develop your skills in supporting students with social-emotional and cognitive learning needs in this session: Structures, Systems, and Routines to Create a Calm Classroom out of Life’s Chaos

Join us on November 20 & 21st at the EPS Academy at Cascade Middle School to get exactly what you need; and earn up to fourteen clock hours doing it!