OnebyOne 2018 Registration Open Today!


Engaging facilitators, good food, unabashed fun, and refreshing learning that matters for you and for kids! Take a look at the line-up for OnebyOne 2018 and register now!

Jaime Casap – Jaime Casap is the Education Evangelist at Google. Jaime evangelizes the power and potential of technology and the web as enabling and supporting tools in pursuit of promoting inquiry-driven project-based learning models. Working with the Google for Education Team, Jaime collaborates with school systems, educational organizations, and leaders focused on building innovation and iteration into our education policies and practices. He speaks on education, technology, innovation, and generation z, at events around the world.

Allison Zmuda – Co-author of Learning Personalized and Students at the Center: Personalized Learning with Habits of Mind, Allison is dedicated to helping teachers “imagine learning experiences that are worthy of the pursuit of both students and teachers”.  Her mission is to “support transition from an outdated process to one that is relevant to the teacher and student.” Allison recognizes that the journey into personalized learning can initially be uncomfortable. She holds a deep respect for teachers in the work they do, and seeks to provide a living strategy to guide them and their students through this ever-changing world.

John Norlin – Co-founder of Character Strong, John teaches about the power of caring schools and communities, and ignites the fire of Servant Leadership for both adult and student learners. At a young age John began to learn first-hand that even a single person being intentional with their actions can create a tidal wave of positive change. In the past twenty years, John has worked with organizations, companies, teams, schools, and individuals on the topics of building influence, strengthening relationships, improving the climate and culture of organizations, and individual and group character development.

Kristin ZiemkeKristin lives and breathes the work everyday in her third grade classroom in Chicago.  She empowers teachers to combine best practice in teaching with technology to amplify student learning. Kristin is co-author of Amplify and Connecting Comprehension and Technology.

Cris Tovani Cris teaches high school full-time while working tirelessly to ensure that secondary teachers have the tools to engage their students in reading, writing and talking.  Cris is the author of I Read It, but I Don’t Get It and Do I Really Have to Teach Reading?

David JakesDavid uses design thinking to inspire educators as they re-imagine learning environments that are creative, comfortable, respectful and safe places for kids and teachers to stretch and take risks.

Page KeeleyScience Guru Page Keeley is an expert in the areas of leadership, standards-based curriculum and instruction, formative assessment, and instructional coaching.  She is adept at helping teachers understand how to use probes and formative assessment to increase the quality of learning in science classroom

Steve Gillcreator of “The ELL Critical Data Process”, Steve is an expert at distinguishing between disability and language acquisition. He works with both EL and SpEd educators on the evaluation process to ensure that students are receiving what they need without being mis-identified.

Gisela Ernst-Slavit – Gisela spreads the message that academic language is an equity imperative; and it’s so much more than just vocabulary! Dr. Ernst-Slavit is professor of education and ELL at WSU. She has co-authored several books has a passion to help teachers understand how to effectively plan instruction that benefits all students, especially your language learners.

Angelina Kreger – Angelina was an instructional coach and social studies educator in Novi, Michigan. She believes that when engaging social studies content is paired with masterful instruction that students are truly provided the building blocks that they need to be successful. She will help teachers engage students in BIG History that weaves evidence and insights from many scientific and historical disciplines across 13.7 billion years into a single, accessible story.

Abbey FutrellAbbey is a Digital Innovation Coach who is committed to redefining professional development to make it relevant and relatable to today’s educators. Her experience as a teacher, district tech facilitator, and instructional coach allow her to take a realistic and sometimes humorous look at the benefits and pitfalls of digital teaching and learning.

Lanny BallLanny is an expert on the Lucy Calkins Writing curriculum. His mission is to support teachers as they seek to reach all students in the literacy workshop.

Amy Lucenta & Grace Kelemanik – co-authors of Routines for Reasoning: Fostering the Mathematical Practices in All Students, Amy and Grace help teachers implement the Standards for Mathematical Practice with a focus on all kids, including special populations.

Mark Ellis – Mark’s work is focused on strategies for mathematics instruction that make meaningful learning accessible to diverse groups of students. Throughout his teaching career, Mark has been driven by a desire to create opportunities for all students to learn important mathematics concepts and skills, particularly those who are from historically underserved groups.

Kris Lindeblad – Kristine  has a passion for mathematics and kids that has led her to a lifelong career in mathematics education. She has taught middle school and high school, been a math instructional coach, and math coordinator for Spokane Public Schools.  She works and learns with teachers as they strive to ensure best practices and instructional excellence in mathematics.

Michele Dufresne – Michele is a classroom teacher and literacy specialist who has spent most of her life teaching children to read. She is the co-developer of Literacy Footprints. Michele is an expert in supporting teachers as they develop the skills they need to facilitate high quality small group and differentiated instruction in reading.



EPS Academy Offers Real Learning that Translates Directly to the Classroom

Do you need time and support to plan units that your kids will engage in and care about?

Sign up for: Learning Design for the Workshop Classroom, or Supported Unit Planning in PBL / Inquiry

My students have Chromebooks, now what?

Beginners, click here! Past beginner, but need more? Click here

Struggling to reach your at-risk kids?

Develop your skills in supporting students with social-emotional and cognitive learning needs in this session: Structures, Systems, and Routines to Create a Calm Classroom out of Life’s Chaos

Join us on November 20 & 21st at the EPS Academy at Cascade Middle School to get exactly what you need; and earn up to fourteen clock hours doing it!

Controversial Ideas in Education

Here’s a question that I love asking fellow educators:

What is something that you believe to be true about teaching and learning that you don’t think anyone else at the table will agree with?

The responses that I’ve heard have been captivating. Sometimes what is shared ends up saying us more about the person’s perceptions of their peers’ opinions, and we all end up learning that we are less alone than we suspected. Hearing a colleague share a controversial belief in a safe and trusting environment tells so much more than hearing beliefs or experiences that you have in common – it breaks the echo chamber of our own thinking. Try asking this question at lunch, in a PLC, or wherever you head to on a Friday afternoon. You might learn something fascinating.

Since this is my blog post, I’ll share one of my own potentially controversial beliefs about teaching and learning:

Our students are under-assessed.

This might seem self-interested coming from someone who works in a district assessment department, but the idea has more to do with time in classrooms than numbers on spreadsheets. Between SBA, the new WCAS, i-Ready, and Panorama, we’ve never had more digital tools for measuring student learning to layer onto our existing techniques. With so many stakeholders in education with very specific purposes, we need a broad range of assessments to meet the needs of students, teachers, families, school leaders, and state officials.

To the extent that we treat assessments as a have-to rather than a get-to, it’s easy to focus on evaluation and labeling of kids, rather than opportunities to better match our teaching to their learning. We need assessments “to inform decisions that both support and verify learning” (Chappuis, Commodore, and Stiggins, 2010). We leave students under-assessed but over-evaluated when we don’t act on the information we collect. Every assessment is an opportunity to allow students to guide our own professional learning. We just need to take them up on it.


Join Us for the Educator Development Series on Wednesday!

The Educator Development Series. It’s not just for new teachers!  The series is designed to facilitate learning for teachers who desire to shore up their foundational knowledge and skills. Personally, I am an educator who is always in need of shoring up in at least a couple of areas!

The series is hosted monthly at Cascade Middle School. This Wednesday, choose from a variety of breakout sessions including Elementary Reader’s Workshop, NCTM’s Effective Math Teaching Practices for Secondary, and much more.  Feel free to join us for any part of the series that fits your specific need, or sign up for all of it! This is a voluntary professional development opportunity. Clock hours are available if at least three hours or more of the series are attended throughout the year.

Meeting a Rock Star

A few years ago Eddie Vedder threw me his tambourine during a concert. I like to fantasize that he picked me out of the crowd because my praying mantis-like dance movements caught his eye; in reality I just out-jumped the people around me to snag it spinning in the air above our heads. Still, I felt connected to my musical idol in a way I never had before. (Humor me here.)  Continue reading “Meeting a Rock Star”

The End of Average, part 3

This is the final post on the The End of Average by Todd Rose. Check out part 1 and part 2 to see the whole series.

This post will focus on two ideas that come out of the second half of the book that have great relevance to our work as K-12 educators: if-then signatures and competency-based learning.

If-then signatures for personal learning profiles

Rose shares his experience receiving guidance from his academic adviser at Weber State that sounded personalized, but turned out to be identical to the advice given to a student with a very different academic background. How often do we give advice or feedback to students that is meaningfully different from the advice that we provide to others? If everything is pretty much the same, is it really personalizedContinue reading “The End of Average, part 3”

Find Your Tribe

The best learning is organic; it happens because we seek it out, we discuss it, we explore it, we do it, and then we do it again! Learning is risk-taking. In the book AMPLIFY, Kristin Ziemke talks about finding your tribe; those professionals that share your passion, that sharpen your thinking, that force reflection.

Connecting with others can sometimes feel awkward or uncomfortable at first, but seeking out professional relationships will “nurture your teacher soul and inspire you to be great”. (Ziemke)

AfterMath is a group of Evergreen elementary teachers who are working together to improve their instructional practices in math. These teachers meet face to face and they connect online. For more information, or to join their Facebook group contact

You can connect with many of your Evergreen colleagues online to share resources or view each other’s blogs. Here’s a peek at some of Brian Cleary’s work: Personalized Learning is isn’t just for Big Kids,  Old Brain Teacher

There are endless opportunities to connect with teachers around the world online. Here is a resource to help you get started:

Put yourself out there! Connect with others who share your passions. Lean on them for ideas and inspiration.  You’ll be glad you did.